Three steps for reading in a foreign language: solving the jigsaw puzzle

Three steps for reading in a foreign language

Three steps for reading in a foreign language

Why is reading in a foreign language so important for learning it?
Why is reading in a foreign language difficult?
Are there any techniques to make it easier?

Read on to find the answers to these questions.

The power of context and stories
The British Council, in one of their campaigns, told us that it only takes a 1000 words to learn a language. This is true if we consider that even mother tongue speakers use a relatively small vocabulary in their everyday life. However, words must be meaningful and related to context for a learner to retain them. The internet is full of lists of words, nevertheless if you have ever tried to learn Italian by memorising words, you will already know that this does not work.

The power of context and stories does not only lie in making vocabulary memorable, but also has the power of contributing meaning to a word, even a new word, that the student has never come across before. Reading is an invaluable way of learning a language and it is especially powerful for learning new vocabulary and phrases.

Why is reading in a foreign language difficult?
Most students find reading Italian literatures difficult. I can see two reasons for this. One is that the material is too hard because the students are still at the intermediate stage or below. The second is that the level of the student is high enough, but the student lacks the right techniques and the mindset. There is a solution for both cases.

Use graded material
If the material is too challenging, this is because these students are intermediate level or below. In this case, the solution is simple: reading graded material will help learning without being overwhelming. Graded materials are books which are written according to the level of the students. They are based on the number of words used. For example the one marked as 400-500 words are for beginners, 1000/1500 are for pre-intermediate level and so on. Start with one that you think you can manage and as your reading becomes easier upgrade to the next level. Even at pre-intermediate levels the next tips should help.

Use the correct reading techniques
The second problem is when a student reads in the same way as they read in their own language: expecting to understand each individual word. This is a common mistake amongst my more advanced students. Unfortunately, this can become exhausting because there will be numerous words that, when first read, they might not be familiar with.

Solving the jigsaw puzzle
Reading a text in a foreign language is like solving a jigsaw puzzle. When you start, you only see a pile of pieces. If you tried to put them together randomly you might be overwhelmed by the task. So, you might start by getting some clues about the puzzle, for example by looking at the picture on the box and by identifying the borders. In a similar way, before reading start to get some clues about the genre of the book, the book cover, the title, the table of contents, the titles of the chapters and any illustrations available. Our brain is wired to produce meaning based on a variety of clues and our previous experiences, trust yourself and let the brain to its job.

3 steps for reading any texts
So, after you got some clues about the book, you are ready to start, and these techniques should help:

1. First read: get the feel
Read as if you want to get the feel of the book, as if you were immersing yourself in a warm bath. Relax and read the entire section from start to finish. This could be the full chapter or if the chapter is too long, choose to begin with half of it. In your first read don’t use the dictionary. Don’t worry about what you don’t understand, focus on what you do. To go back to our puzzle analogy: use the key words you do understand to piece the rest together.
After finishing, try to summarise what you have understood. Use logic, what do you think happened, so what usually follows?

2. Second read: get the gist
The second read is when you will start underlining some words which you think are key to understand the sentence or the paragraph. These words should be crucial to the meaning of the chunk of text and very few. Even in this second read, don’t use the dictionary. Your understanding after the second read will be far greater compared to the first, even without the dictionary. Read again till the end. Trust yourself and the ability of your mind to understand more than you think.

3. Third read: dig deeper
The third read is when I would use the dictionary. Using it only now will ensure that those words have become already meaningful to you even if you don’t grasp them completely and therefore also more memorable. The work that you have done without the dictionary has given those words some meaning already, and you have built up the overwhelming desire to understand what they mean. In the same way as when you only have a small piece missing in the puzzle, you can already imagine what you are looking for. This process is what enables your long-term memory. This is because our minds have been designed to retain only information that is perceived as important.

Changing your mindset about reading
Ultimately, for reading in a foreign language, we need to change our mindset. Abandoning the fear of unknown words and accepting that we need a fresh way to approach an authentic text written for native speakers. Learn like children do; throwing yourselves into the new, using your imagination and especially enjoying your reading.

To sum it up:
In short, reading in the target language requires the same techniques as solving a jigsaw puzzle. At the beginning it looks complicated but if you stick with it all the pieces fall into place. Follow the techniques described without fear and trust yourself and the process.

Happy reading!

Fancy join our book club?
We read one selected chapter of a given book and develop speaking in sessions moderated by native teachers.
Click here if you wish to know how our book club works. You can book your session here.

Il carnevale italiano (level A2+)

what is carnevale in italy all about

What is Carnevale in Italy all about

Vi siete mai chiesti in cosa consiste il carnevale italiano? Perché si celebra, quando si celebra e perché si portano maschere e travestimenti? Perché gli italiani dicono: “A carnevale ogni scherzo vale”? Continua a leggere per scoprirlo…

Carnevale è un periodo di festeggiamenti cattolico e cristiano. Il periodo iniziava dopo l’Epifania, il 7 gennaio. Oggigiorno però, il periodo carnevalesco vero e proprio cade l’ultima settimana prima della Quaresima. Ha inizio il giovedì grasso e termina la settimana dopo con il martedì grasso. Questo è il giorno prima del giorno delle ceneri.

La parola carnevale deriva dal latino “Carnem levare”, e significa appunto levare o togliere la carne dalla dieta.

Si riferisce infatti alle celebrazioni e feste precedenti il giorno delle ceneri, che demarca l’inizio della Quaresima, quando inizia il digiuno e la rinuncia alla carne.

Carnevale è un festeggiamento antichissimo, caratterizzato da feste esuberanti e variopinte, dove tutto è permesso e dove sono di regola scherzi, giochi, finzione e mascheramenti. Viene celebrato con il teatro mettendo in scena commedie divertenti con personaggi mascherati. In queste commedie, immancabilmente, i ricchi e potenti vengono presi in giro e ridicolizzati.

Anche oggi, questa idea del ridicolizzare i potenti è rappresentata per esempio nei famosi carri allegorici che sfilano per le strade delle maggiori città. Venezia è conosciuta in tutto il mondo per le sue celebrazioni di carnevale come lo è Viareggio.

Anche i bambini celebrano il carnevale mascherandosi e mettendo in scena recite di teatro. È anche tradizione uscire per strada per essere ammirati nei loro costumi e gettare coriandoli e stelle filanti.

Il cibo è sempre importante in ogni celebrazione italiana e a carnevale gli italiani mangiano delle frittelle dolci particolari. Sono simili in tutta Italia anche se prendono nomi differenti. In alcune regioni si chiamano chiacchiere, in altre bugie, cenci, carafoi, ecc.

Il tipico motto di carnevale è: a carnevale ogni scherzo vale.

Perché a carnevale ogni burla, beffa, e scherzo sono non solo permessi, ma richiesti! Allora, a carnevale, state attenti quanto aprite la porta perché un sacco di farina potrebbe cadervi in testa!

Our Italian classes online starts soon, please visit our website: Group Italian Classes on Zoom

For more information please email: laura@parlaitaliano.co.uk or phone 07941 092593

If you like to subscribe to this newsletter, please insert your email address below:

The Italian Carnival

italian carnival traditions

Italian carnival traditions

So, what is the Italian Carnival, why do people celebrate this, when do they celebrate it, why do they dress up in costumes and what is the importance of the masks? And furthermore, why do Italian say: A carnivale ogni scherzo vale? Read on to find out…

Carnevale is a Catholic festive period that starts after the 6th of January. However, the main festivities and celebrations are carried out in the week preceding Lent. It starts on Thursday (‘Giovedigrasso’) and ends the following week on Tuesday (‘Martedi grasso’), which is the day before Ash Wednesday (‘Il giorno delle ceneri‘).

The word Carnevale comes from the Latin “Carnem levare”, meaning ‘remove the meat’ and it refers to the celebrations and feasts preceding Ash Wednesday, which marks the start of Lent when people would fast and abstain from eating meat.

Carnevale is an ancient tradition that was characterised by a period of exuberance, excess, folly, mockery, and a sense of general release. It would be celebrated with theatre and especially with comedies. The main characters, dressed in costumes and wearing a mask (la Maschera), would enact practical jokes at the expense of the rich and powerful.

Today, carnevale maintains its ancient idea of mockery and of making fun of the powerful. For example with the elaborate carnival floats are paraded in the major cities. Some of the most famous celebrations are in Venice and Viareggio, but most cities will have a celebratory parade.

Children celebrate Carnevale by dressing up in costumes and a mask, taking to the streets and throwing confetti and streamers around.

Food is always important in any Italian celebration and at Carnevale Italians eat a special type of sweet fritter.

It is eaten in all Italian regions but called with different names. In some regions they are known as chiacchiere, in others frappe or bugie, cenci, carafoi, etc.

The famous saying of carnival is a Carnevale ogni scherzo vale. At carnival all tricks, jokes and practical jokes are allowed. So be careful when you open your door, a bag of flour might just fall on your head!

Our classes start soon, please visit our website: Group Italian Classes on Zoom

For more information please email: laura@parlaitaliano.co.uk or phone 07941 092593

If you like to subscribe to this newsletter, please insert your email address below:

Un cielo stellato (livello A2+)

italian night sky

Italian night sky

20 Novembre 2020

Il blog

Ecco un’altra puntata del nostro blog. Questo può essere complementare alla vostra lezione di italiano (Italian class). Può aiutarvi a capire la cultura italiana (Italian culture) e la lingua italiana (Italian language).

Come inizia la nostra storia

Sono un’insegnante di italiano come seconda lingua e ho vissuto a Londra per decenni. Sono sposata con un uomo inglese e abbiamo due figli. Nel settembre 2020 abbiamo deciso di trasferirci nel mio paesino originario che si trova in Italia fra il Lago di Como e le Alpi.

Un’app stellare

A mio marito piace osservare il cielo e gli astri e ha un’app sul telefono che gli permette di individuare il nome di pianeti e costellazioni. Purtroppo, a Londra dove vivevamo, il cielo è sempre troppo illuminato e non è possibile vederli. La bellezza di vivere qui è che tutte le notti il cielo è coperto di stelle luminose.

La passeggiata notturna

Ieri sera dopo cena, ci siamo vestiti bene perché inizia a far freddo la sera e siamo usciti. Siamo andati a fare una passeggiata nel buio. La stradina che abbiamo preso era deserta, abbiamo camminato un po’ e poi ci siamo fermati a guardare le stelle.

“Solo Nell’oscurità puoi vedere le stelle”

Sembra che Martin Luther King Jr. abbia detto: “Solo nell’oscurità puoi vedere le stelle”. Si possono dare molte interpretazioni a questa frase. Per esemio: nell’oscurità, anche se questa ci spaventa, possiamo superare la paura, riplendere e scoprire la nostra forza. Oppure – e questa è la mia interpretazione preferita al momento – solo nella semplicità del buio, quando non siamo distratti da quello che ci circonda, scopriamo l’essenza delle cose.

Questo è un po’ anche il messaggio che sto ricevendo dal vivere in un piccolo paesino in lockdown. Guardiamo le stelle e godiamo di questi momenti semplici ma preziosi.

Our next blog will be announced on our Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/italianinlondon

If you like to subscribe to this newsletter, please insert your email address below:

Il confinamento in Italia (livello A2)

italian cities lockdown coronavirus

Italian cities lockdown coronavirus

13 Novembre 2020

Ecco un’altra puntata del nostro blog.

Questo può essere complementare alla vostra lezione di italiano (Italian class). Può aiutarvi a capire la cultura italiana (Italian culture) e la lingua italiana (Italian language).

Sono un’insegnante di italiano come seconda lingua e ho vissuto a Londra per decenni. Sono sposata con un uomo inglese e abbiamo due figli. Nel settembre 2020 abbiamo deciso di trasferirci nel mio paesino originario che si trova in Italia fra il Lago di Como e le Alpi.

Con questo blog intendo scrivere della nostra vita, della bellezza della natura, del ritorno a casa, e così via, ma non voglio dare l’idea di una vita idillica, non lo è.

La scelta di venire in Italia ora

Io e mio marito Robin a volte ci diciamo: non è strano che con tutte le opportunità che abbiamo avuto di venire in Italia, abbiamo scelto l’anno di Covid e di Brexit. Peggio di così non potevamo fare! Ma poi ridiamo. Il momento ideale non esiste, esiste solo il fare o il non fare. Le difficoltà ci saranno sempre.

Il lockdown

Come negli altri Paesi, anche in Italia è iniziato il secondo confinamento, o ‘lockdown’ come preferiscono chiamarlo anche in Italia. Le istruzioni sono abbastanza chiare, non è possibile uscire dal nostro paesino, è meglio lavorare da casa se possibile, si può uscire per fare la spesa e per fare moto, la maggior parte dei negozi è chiusa. Credo che il nostro confinamento sia simile a quello di altri Paesi. Ci sono però delle particolarità, per esempio: gli estetisti sono chiusi, ma i parrucchieri no. I negozi di abbigliamento sono chiusi ma quelli di intimo no. Anche i negozi che vendono giocattoli sono aperti. Sono sicura che ci sia una logica in queste scelte, forse.

Covid

Per quanto riguarda Covid, la situazione è leggermente più allarmante per noi, non perché ci siano molti casi ma perché non abbiamo ancora il medico di famiglia. Fortunatamente mio marito e i miei figli hanno appena ricevuto i documenti necessari e domani finalmente andremo all’ufficio competente che spero ci assegnerà un medico. Per quanto riguarda me, ancora non li ho ricevuti, cercherò di non ammalarmi!

Apprezzare le piccole cose

Comunque, è ancora possibile uscire per fare moto e visto che le giornate di sole sono ancora abbastanza calde, usciamo per fare delle belle passeggiate. Ci accontentiamo di godere di queste cose semplici: il sole, l’aria pulita, il cibo italiano, la famiglia e la natura che ci circonda.

Annunceremo il nostro prossimo blog sulla pagina Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/italianinlondon

If you like to subscribe to this newsletter, please insert your email address below:

La misteriosa cassetta di kiwi (livello A2)

italian kiwi

Italian kiwi

Ecco un’altra puntata del nostro blog. Questo può essere complementare alla vostra lezione di italiano (Italian class). Può aiutarvi a capire la cultura italiana (Italian culture) e la lingua italiana (Italian language).

I kiwi misteriosi

Oggi sono scesa di sotto e fuori dalla porta ho trovato una cassetta di kiwi. Che sorpresa! Ma chi li avrà lasciati? Forse mio marito è andato al mercato? Forse è un regalo? Oppure, li ho comprati io e poi li ho dimenticati fuori? Sto perdendo la memoria? Continua a leggere per scoprire la risposta.

Il trasferimento

Sono italiana, ma vivo a Londra da decenni, sono sposata con un uomo inglese e abbiamo due figli. Recentemente ci siamo trasferiti in un piccolo paese dove vivono ancora i miei fratelli e dove anche noi abbiamo una casa.

A Londra non c’è più nessun membro della nostra famiglia, nè di quella inglese, nè di quella italiana. C’è un fratello di mio marito ma abita lontano. Quindi i nostri figli normalmente non vedono il resto della nostra famiglia, tranne quando siamo in vacanza in Italia.

Ora che ci siamo trasferiti, mio fratello, o come lo chiamiamo in casa, lo zio Enrico, ci fa spesso delle sorprese.

Siamo fortunati, visto che quest’anno ha deciso di prendere un anno sabbatico. Mio fratello è single, così ogni settimana viene a pranzo da noi e poi gioca con i bambini. Ridiamo e raccontiamo vecchie storie della nostra famiglia. Usiamo il nostro lessico familiare*, un linguaggio nostro che solo una persona della famiglia può capire. Alle volte basta una smorfia o un movimento delle mani, per capire di cosa o chi si stia parlando.
Un giorno sono scesa di sotto e ho trovato una cassetta di kiwi. Ecco che lo zio dopo aver raccolto i kiwi dalle sue piante, li ha lasciati fuori dalla nostra porta di casa per farci una sorpresa.
Grazie zio Enrico!

Nel nostro prossimo blog scriveremo un aggiornamento divertente sul fatto di non avere ancora il medico di famiglia. A venerdì!

*Lessico Familiare è un libro scritto da Natalia Ginsburg, lo consiglio agli studenti di lingua italiana, in quanto relativamente facile da leggere ma soprattutto molto bello.

Annunceremo il nostro prossimo blog sulla pagina Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/italianinlondon

If you like to subscribe to this newsletter, please insert your email address below:

La riscoperta di casa (livello A2/B1)

italian landscape

Italian landscape

30 ottobre 2020

Ecco un’altra puntata del nostro blog. Questo può essere complementare alla vostra lezione di italiano (Italian class). Può aiutarvi a capire la cultura italiana (Italian culture) e la lingua italiana (Italian language).

Sono un’insegnante di italiano come seconda lingua e ho vissuto a Londra per decenni. Sono sposata con un uomo inglese e abbiamo due figli. Nel settembre 2020 abbiamo deciso di trasferirci nel mio paesino originario che si trova in Italia fra il Lago di Como e le Alpi.

Per più di vent’anni ho vissuto a Londra, ne sono stata attratta, l’ho desiderata, mi sono immersa con piacere nel suo ritmo frenetico. L’ho conosciuta pian piano, l’ho amata, l’ho criticata e infine è diventata casa. Non avevo nostalgia dell’Italia nè il desiderio di tornare, o forse sì.

Ora che sono tornata in Italia, anche qui mi sento a casa. Si tratta però di una senzazione strana fatta di familiarità ma anche di sorpresa e di scoperta. Mi sorprendo a guardare dalla finestra, vedo la montagna che sovrasta tutte le altre ed è come se la vedessi per la prima volta. Non ho mai notato i suoi colori che cambiano drammaticamente con il cambio di stagione. La trovo bellissima. La natura mi circonda, e ogni volta che la guardo la sento sussurrare. Le montagne in particolare mi parlano della sua maestà, del suo potere e della sua protezione.

Care montagne mi siete mancate!

Annunceremo il nostro prossimo blog sulla pagina Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/italianinlondon

If you like to subscribe to this newsletter, please insert your email address below:

Il nostro autunno in Italia (livello A2)

autumn in italian

Autumn in Italian

21 ottobre 2020

Ecco la seconda puntata del nostro blog. Questo può essere complementare alla vostra lezione di italiano (Italian class). Può aiutarvi a capire la cultura italiana (Italian culture) e la lingua italiana (Italian language).

La nostra avventura continua

Mio marito ed io abbiamo deciso di trasferirci in Italia da Londra con i nostri due figli. Ci siamo trasferiti a settembre 2020. Abbiamo preso questa decisione per far fare ai nostri figli un’esperienza di vita in un paese piccolo e a contatto con la natura.

Il nostro paesino è su un piccolo lago, collegato al lago di Como e circondato da montagne. Dalle nostre finestre vediamo ogni giorno i primi segni del cambiamento di stagione. I picchi delle montagne hanno iniziato a coprirsi di neve e dove erano verdi stanno cambiando colore.

Festività e occasioni autunnali

A Londra, la nostra famiglia ha sempre festeggiato Halloween. In Italia invece, specialmente dove viviamo, non è particolarmente popolare e quindi abbiamo deciso di far scoprire ai nostri figli altre tradizioni tipiche della nostra zona.

La prima tradizione è relativa alle castagne. La raccolta e la preparazione delle castagne è una tradizione di tutte le famiglie della zona. Anche noi abbiamo portato i bambini in montagna per raccogliere le castagne.

Abbiamo poi invitato i nostri più cari parenti e amici, arrostito le castagne sul fuoco e passato un pomeriggio con del buon vino e della buona compagnia.

Altre festività tipiche dell’autunno sono il festeggiamento di Ognissanti e della commemorazione dei morti. La commemorazione dei defunti è infatti una festività antichissima che precede il cristianesimo. Un dolce tipico italiano di queso periodo si chiama proprio ossa dei morti ed è un dolce delizioso che al nord ha un colore scuro ed è coperto di zucchero. Gnam gnam!

Riusciremo a risolvere il nostro problema?

Vi ricordate, uno dei nostri problemi è stato non avere il medico di famiglia. Seguite il blog per sapere se questa storia ha un lieto fine 😉.

Annunceremo il nostro prossimo blog sulla pagina Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/italianinlondon

If you like to subscribe to this newsletter, please insert your email address below:

Learning a language successfully: you only need one rule

how to successfully learn a new language

How to successfully learn a new language

After many years of teaching Italian to adults I have come to the conclusion that for learning successfully there is only one rule: don’t give up!

Recently, a person that I don’t know sent me a message telling me that she had been studying Italian for some times, but she had now given it up. She was contacting me for other reasons than studying Italian but my first emotion upon receiving such email was one of sadness. The way she phrased her message made me think that she had been learning for a while and that she had lost hope.

In my years of teaching I have come across many different students, some natural linguists, some average learners and some very slow learners. No matter the student talent we worked together to achieve language learning and mostly succeeded. Whenever it happened that a person did not succeed it was because they had given up.

Of course, I do understand, that sometime students only want to try something new. After a term of classes, some decide that this is enough and that they wish to try something else. Trying something new is a healthy and it is not giving up. Giving up is due to the belief that we are not achieving, we are not good enough and we might as well stop trying.

How to successfully learn a new language

I still remember a student I taught about twelve years ago, he was clearly a very intelligent man, with a great career, economic success and very satisfied with his life. He had a reason for learning, however teaching him was difficult, extracting one word from him excruciating. He was not a natural language learner to say the least. However, he had something even more powerful, he had grit, he would not give up, year after year he stuck with it and he achieved his goal. He started to be more and more fluent and became satisfied with his language skills.

What is the secret of his success? His determination of course. But also, even if he had accepted that learning was difficult, he never compared himself to others. He acknowledged and celebrated every little success. And such a great teacher he was to me!

Parla Italiano new Italian classes for adults open every term, please get in touch if you are interested by email: laura@parlaitaliano.co.uk or phone laura on 07941 092593

Italian classes for children and the importance of movement

italian classes for children

Italian classes for children

In our Italian classes no matter what the student age is, we never just sit on a chair but we offer a variety of activities so that our students can move. We believe that learning takes place when we feel free and relaxed. This is why movement is important in our classes.

Even in our adult classes we carefully select games to consolidate vocabulary and structures learnt. Adults move in class during the games, during ‘mingling’ activities, and they are sometimes invited to the board to take ownership of a particular activity.

Movement is even more important in our children classes. Children unlike adults have a short attention span, albeit which grows with age.

We account for this in all of our classes. For example our 3-5 classes are taught mainly on the carpet. However, children are invited to stand during singing time. They can move around during our role plays (picture 1.) and during games. Because the class is varied and time standing/moving/on the carpet is alternated, when it is time to listen to a story in Italian or to work on activities that require attention, children are able to sit, listen and concentrate (pictures 2. and 3.). Storytelling is a very important element in our classes. Our storytelling time is always interactive. So children are asked questions – always in Italian – and they are invited to participate actively in it. All our classes at all levels and for all ages are taught exclusively in Italian and students are interacting with our teachers in Italian.

Class 3-5 years old, 1. Role play 2. Story told in pictures, 3. Puppet show

 

As the children grow their attention span grows and they are more able to sit still for longer periods.

Students in our Italian 7-9 class, have a chair with a table as they are asked to write in some of the activities. Activities however, are varied and students are expected to move during some of the activities. For example we offer time to work in pairs or in small groups on the floor (picture below) as well as standing time; for example time on the board during a game, a mime activity and so on.

Class 7-9 years old, group work